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Home / Teach English in Greece: The Complete Guide for TEFL Teachers | Reviewed May 2022

TEFL Jobs In Greece

Overview

Would you like to teach English in Greece? Greece combines the allure of ancient sites and traditions with the conveniences of modern living. Choose between a tranquil small village and a bustling metropolis; Greece has both. Athens, the capital city, with a population of 3.2 million people and a special atmosphere. This makes it a destination often considered by those who want to teach English in Greece.

Despite the economic difficulties, people continue to flock to Greece. Expats from all over the world are drawn to Greece because of its natural beauty and the Greek way of life. Like other Mediterranean countries, Greeks believe in ‘Don’t work to live, rather live to work.’ They also value excellent company and good food.

There are fewer opportunities available to teach English in Greece than previously, and competition is fierce. As a result, some experienced TEFL teachers have been able to find more lucrative employment elsewhere, creating more openings for newcomers. However, those who want to stay in Greece are willing to accept lower-paying jobs, making it difficult to find work in major cities. Because of some recruiting constraints, large chain firms are often easier to work for, but it’s also a good idea to hunt for jobs at smaller institutions off the usual path.

This guide will help you understand the work culture in Greece and the opportunities you will find. It explains the lifestyle and the requirements needed to find English teaching jobs in Greece.

Types of jobs teaching English in Greece

In Greece, teaching employment is often a one-year contract. You might find a job for a few years, but your contract will be renewed every year. The teaching contracts are for the school year, which runs from September to June. Thankfully, most TEFL programmes assist its graduates in finding new jobs, and if they decide not to hire you for another term, the school may be nice enough to lead you in the direction of posted positions.

The majority of jobs will be in public or private schools, dealing with students of all ages. These are the positions that your TEFL programme will assist you in obtaining; however, you may be able to find one for yourself if you prefer. There are also generally opportunities to teach private lessons, and tutor in your spare time to earn some extra money. Again, your program’s and/or school’s employers could be able to point you in the right direction as they are likely to be asked by parents looking for extra tutor lessons for their child. 

Students who require extra assistance or people in business with international experience typically attend private lessons, especially older students who may be looking to continue their education in an English speaking country or who might want to try and get a job in England. If you live in a smaller town, there may not be as many individuals seeking for private lessons, but you should not have too much trouble in the cities, it could be worth your while travelling to teach but you will find other expats in the same situation who could give you tips and pointers for getting students.

Job types

In Greece, teaching employment is often a one-year contract. You might find a job for a few years, but your contract will be renewed every year. The teaching contracts are for the school year, which runs from September to June. Thankfully, most TEFL programmes assist its graduates in finding new jobs, and if they decide not to hire you for another term, the school may be nice enough to lead you in the direction of posted positions.

The majority of jobs will be in public or private schools, dealing with students of all ages. These are the positions that your TEFL programme will assist you in obtaining; however, you may be able to find one for yourself if you prefer. There are also generally opportunities to teach private lessons, and tutor in your spare time to earn some extra money. Again, your program’s and/or school’s employers could be able to point you in the right direction as they are likely to be asked by parents looking for extra tutor lessons for their child. 

Students who require extra assistance or people in business with international experience typically attend private lessons, especially older students who may be looking to continue their education in an English speaking country or who might want to try and get a job in England. Something to consider if you are looking to teach English in Greece, is if you live in a smaller town, there may not be as many individuals seeking for private lessons, but you should not have too much trouble in the cities, it could be worth your while travelling to teach but you will find other expats in the same situation who could give you tips and pointers for getting students.

Finding a job

When and where to look for a job teaching English in Greece

A TEFL Greece programme is the easiest way to get a job teaching in the country. These programmes will train you, certify you, and frequently assist you in finding a job. In Greece, there are various TEFL programmes located in most of the major cities. Therefore, the position would most likely be in one of Greece’s main cities or a mid-sized village. But it does mean you can find a job in an area that suits you best. Obviously, cities are busier to live in, but if you want a quieter pace of life, you will find that in the mid-sized villages.

You should start looking for work in the spring. Because Greece’s academic schedule follows that of most other nations, they will hire in the spring and early summer before the school year begins from September to June. If you wait until July or August, you’re unlikely to find anything because those are peak vacation months, and few Greeks will answer emails while on holiday. However, you could find some work in private tutoring in the holidays or volunteering to teach English in Greece at summer camps while waiting for the school year to restart.

Qualifications needed

The requirements for teaching English in Greece are relatively similar. You must be an English native speaker with a university degree and TEFL certification. While you will need to have a Bachelor’s degree, they do not, however, require a specific degree (though Arts & Languages is preferable). There are rarely any criteria regarding your level of the Greek language. You will be able to pick up basic conversational Greek in your time there or look for a local to help you gain more comprehensive skills.

A visa is required to work as an English teacher in Greece. This is primarily due to the fact that you will be staying for more than 90 days. A valid passport, visa application, tax and bank forms, travel insurance, and a letter from your employer confirming your position and income are all required. Visit the Greek embassy’s website for the complete list, but you will need to have the job in place before you can apply. As previously stated you could go on holiday to start with and look for opportunities. 

Teacher Culture

You’ll be required to keep things professional at work, but that doesn’t imply it’ll be stuffy. For work, Greek business people wear suits or business casual. Most schools allow business casual attire. Because of their traditional past, Greeks want women to cover their shoulders and wear skirts/slacks that reach at least the top of the knee at work, and men to wear slacks, never shorts. It is vital that you fit in with local cultures and traditions, so consider this before deciding what clothes to take with you.

Because Greece does not have nearly as many English speakers as some other Westernised European countries, knowing the Greek customs will help you fit in and enjoy life. When passing someone and making eye contact, you must always say “hello” or “good morning/evening.” It is considered impolite if you do not. It is worth learning to greet in Greek, so you feel comfortable when meeting people. 

You might also be able to work with one of your advanced pupils to assist you in improving your Greek. Find a student who requires extra assistance after school and ask if they will teach you Greek while you help them with their English.

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LIVING COSTS

Greece experienced a severe financial and economic crisis in 2007-2008, from which it is still recovering. Prices have begun to rise in Greece in recent years now that the situation has stabilised, but it remains a low-cost destination for both tourists and expats. Locally, unemployment was approximately 30% of the population in 2013, and while the situation has improved to around 15%, youth unemployment remains a serious worry, having reduced from 60% to closer to 30% in 2020. The ongoing struggle in Greece is a double-edged sword for TEFL teachers: the country’s cheap cost of living makes it simple to get by, but it also makes it difficult to move ahead.

However, because of a shortage of spare income, residents are frequently unable to purchase luxuries such as language courses. Young people can’t afford to spend money on learning a second language, but they know that learning English will allow them to travel and work overseas, giving them possibilities they wouldn’t have had otherwise. As a result, it’s a mixed bag.

Because Greece has a high VAT rate, expect to pay a lot for imported goods. With a delectable and well-known healthy national cuisine, embracing Greek cuisine will be beneficial to your money as well as your waistline. While the cost of a beer or coffee may be comparable to that of other European countries, you’ll note how much less expensive housing is in Greece — renting is inexpensive and accessible, and even in more affluent locations, you can find a great place to live. Many schools provide housing for English teachers in Greece, which helps to compensate for the poor pay.

Cost of living figures are supplied by Numbeo.com, the world’s largest cost of living comparison site.

  • Accommodation: £407–£674/€460–€800
  • Utilities: £103/€117
  • Cost of a typical visit to a GP: £34/€40
  • Monthly transport pass: £27/€31
  • Basic dinner out for two: £26/€30
  • Cappuccino in expat area: £3.49/€4.01
  • A beer in a pub: £3.84/€4.18
  • 1 litre of milk: £1.12/€1.22

TEFL Jobs In Greece: KEY POINTS

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AVERAGE SALARY

€700–€1,000

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EDUCATION NEEDED

Prerequisite university degree

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TEFL CERTIFICATE NEEDED

120 Hour TEFL Certificate

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MAIN JOB TYPES

Public, private schools & freelance

KEY FACTS

  • Popular locations for TEFL jobs: Athens, Heraklion, Katerini, Thessaloniki, Rhodes, Mykonos, Santorini, Corfu, and Crete; however, there will be opportunities in other areas.
  • The average salary for EFL teachers: The basic monthly salary for full-time positions is likely to be in the region of €700–€1,000 (£630–£900/$790–$1,100) per month. An hourly rate of €25–€30 (£22.50–£27/$28–$34) from professional organisations in big cities, freelancers will charge around €15 (£13.50/$17) per hour or €10 (£9/$11) for group lessons.
  • TEFL qualification requirements: A 120-hour TEFL certificate is a minimum requirement for nearly all jobs, and the better qualified you are, the better your chances.
  • Teach English in Greece requirements: Prerequisite university degree: Required for all state-teaching jobs, beneficial for most positions.
  • Term times: September to June.
  • Currency: Euro
  • Language: Greek
  • Teaching English in Greece programmes: Public Schools, Private Language Schools, Freelance.
  • Age restrictions: None
  • Previous experience: Previous English teaching experience in Greece is not as important as being qualified, but still likely to help you get work if you have a few years of experience in other countries.

Private schools in Greece that employed TEFL teachers were compelled to cut costs or close altogether during the economic crisis. The private education sector was hit hard, and the number of TEFL jobs in Greece plummeted. It’s still challenging to obtain work these days, especially in some locations. The more affluent locations and cities, like Athens, Rhodes, Mykonos, Santorini, Corfu, and Crete, are likely to employ TEFL teachers. However, because the cost of living in gorgeous Greek islands and big cities is significantly greater than in rural countryside locations, you may find it simpler to save money if you can find a job in a smaller area. Edessa, Larissa, and Preveza are smaller areas to investigate.

While some schools have remained open, competition is fierce. With so many schools closing, many experienced TEFL teachers are looking for work in Greece, making it difficult for those new to the area or inexperienced to get a job. Many unemployed English teachers turn to private tutoring, lowering their fees to the point where parents believe hiring a private English teacher in Greece for their child is a better bargain than sending them to a language school.

With so many Greeks (especially younger people) out of jobs, there may be resentment toward foreigners who can find work in their nation. Also, keep in mind that the government mandates a foreigner-to-Greek employee ratio of 1:10; therefore, small enterprises are unable to hire non-Greek workers. Full-time roles will be around 25–30 hours per week, but many schools have decreased their hours to approximately 12–18 hours per week (and lower earnings), so freelance work will be necessary to supplement your income.

Facts about Teach English in Greece: The Complete Guide for TEFL Teachers | Reviewed May 2022

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LANGUAGE

Greek

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POPULATION

10 million

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TEFL TEACHERS DEMAND

High

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CURRENCY

Euro

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CAPITAL

Athens

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OUR SPAIN TEFL RATING

4.8/5 stars

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TEFL Jobs In Greece: FAQS

Q:

How much can I earn teaching English in Greece?

The basic monthly salary for full-time positions is between €700 – €1,000 ($790–$1,100) per month. You can top up your income by taking on private work as an English tutor for children and adults if you struggle to find English teaching jobs in Greece

Popular locations for TEFL jobs in Greece: Athens, Heraklion, Katerini, Thessaloniki, Rhodes, Mykonos, Santorini, Corfu, and Crete, but you will find positions in other areas.

The requirements for teaching English in Greece are very common. You must be an English native speaker with a university degree and TEFL certification. However, your degree does not have to be in English, and you must have gained some TEFL hours. 

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